Curriculum & Course Lists

Middle School Courses

Getting today’s middle school digital natives excited about learning is truly possible. All it takes is an outstanding curriculum and dedicated teachers. MY Academy has both!

MY Academy offers an accredited, award-winning curriculum filled with videos, illustrations, virtual reality, and interactive content to keep students engaged. Courses are coupled with teachers who have current California teaching credentials to provide one-on-one attention for all students and ensuring success.

MATHEMATICS

Geometry

Geometry courses typically cover topics that develop students knowledge in establishing criteria for congruence of triangles based on rigid motions; establishing criteria for similarity of triangles based on dilations and proportional reasoning; informally developing explanations of circumference, area, and volume formulas; applying the Pythagorean Theorem to the coordinate plane; proving basic geometric theorems; and extending work with probability. Geometry courses present students with the opportunity to explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, as well as present and hear formal mathematical arguments.

Integrated Math 1

Integrated Mathematics I courses typically cover topics that combine the basic principles of algebra, geometry, and statistics and probability. Integrated Mathematics I courses present students with the opportunity to extend their understanding of numerical manipulation to algebraic manipulation; synthesize

Math 6

Math (Departmentalized K-8) typically cover topics such as arithmetic using rational numbers, the numeration systems, simple data analysis, and place value. In higher grades the course may include basic algebra, basic geometry, and basic statistics, concepts of rate and ratio. Math (Departmentalized K-8) courses present students with the opportunity to reinforce concepts and skills in mathematics and apply these skills to real world problems and situations.

Math 7

Math (Departmentalized K-8) typically cover topics such as arithmetic using rational numbers, the numeration systems, simple data analysis, and place value. In higher grades the course may include basic algebra, basic geometry, and basic statistics, concepts of rate and ratio. Math (Departmentalized K-8) courses present students with the opportunity to reinforce concepts and skills in mathematics and apply these skills to real world problems and situations.

Math 8

Pre-Algebra courses typically cover topics such as exponents and radicals, the rectangular coordinate system, sets, logic formulas, and solving first-degree equations and inequalities. Pre-Algebra courses present students with the opportunity to obtain an extra year of study for students who have attained standard mathematics objectives, but are not ready to enter algebra.

Math Exploration 6

Math (Departmentalized K-8) typically cover topics such as arithmetic using rational numbers, the numeration systems, simple data analysis, and place value. In higher grades the course may include basic algebra, basic geometry, and basic statistics, concepts of rate and ratio. Math (Departmentalized K-8) courses present students with the opportunity to reinforce concepts and skills in mathematics and apply these skills to real world problems and situations.

Math Exploration 7

Math (Departmentalized K-8) typically cover topics such as arithmetic using rational numbers, the numeration systems, simple data analysis, and place value. In higher grades the course may include basic algebra, basic geometry, and basic statistics, concepts of rate and ratio. Math (Departmentalized K-8) courses present students with the opportunity to reinforce concepts and skills in mathematics and apply these skills to real world problems and situations.

Math Exploration 8

Pre-Algebra courses typically cover topics such as exponents and radicals, the rectangular coordinate system, sets, logic formulas, and solving first-degree equations and inequalities. Pre-Algebra courses present students with the opportunity to obtain an extra year of study for students who have attained standard mathematics objectives, but are not ready to enter algebra.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Social Science 6

Departmentalized History-Social Science courses typically cover the content outlined by grade level in the California History-Social Science Standards. Departmentalized history-social science courses present students with the opportunity to study significant people, events, developments and political movements of a specific era of time. In these courses, the instructor may teach specific content to several different groups of students during multiple classes throughout the day.

Social Science 7

World History courses typically cover topics such as the socio-economic, political, and ideological conditions of various time periods as well as significant historical events and cultural achievements of world regions. World History courses present students with the opportunity to learn about the achievements of civilizations and countries, particularly in the fields of science, technology, and the arts, and how they spread through cultural diffusion. Students will compare and contrast the development and beliefs of the major world religions, explain how they spread to other regions, and resulted in ideological conflicts throughout history.

Social Science 8

United States History courses typically cover major turning points in American history and emphasize specific themes, such as the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts; the continuing tension between the individual and the state and between minority rights and majority power; and the emergence of a modern economy. United States history courses present students with the opportunity to study the impact of technology on American society and culture; change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movements toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the development of the United States as a world power.

LANGUAGE ARTS

English Exploration

English courses typically cover topics that build upon the students prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing. English language arts courses present students the opportunity to write persuasive and creative multi-paragraph thematic essays and compositions, and develop literary analysis skills. English courses introduce students to various genres of literature through writing exercises often linked to the reading selections. In upper-level courses students write essays and learn the techniques of writing research papers. English courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.

Language Arts

English courses typically cover topics that build upon the students prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing. English language arts courses present students the opportunity to write persuasive and creative multi-paragraph thematic essays and compositions, and develop literary analysis skills. English courses introduce students to various genres of literature through writing exercises often linked to the reading selections. In upper-level courses students write essays and learn the techniques of writing research papers. English courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.

SCIENCE

Life Science

Life Science courses typically cover topics such as ecosystems, photosynthesis and respiration, cells and body systems, evolution, inheritance and genetics and natural selection. Life science courses present students with an opportunity to apply the principles of conservation, investigate interrelationships of organisms within ecosystems and develop environmental literacy.

Science 6

Earth and space science courses typically cover topics associated with Earths place in the universe, Earths systems and Earth and human activity. Earth and space science courses present students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of processes that shape the world around them. This course also investigates how humans interact with the natural world by integrating Californias Environmental Principles and Concepts. Geoscience is another name used to identify the course.

Science 7

Life Science courses typically cover topics such as ecosystems, photosynthesis and respiration, cells and body systems, evolution, inheritance and genetics and natural selection. Life science courses present students with an opportunity to apply the principles of conservation, investigate interrelationships of organisms within ecosystems and develop environmental literacy.

Science 8

Physical science courses typically cover topics such as matter, motion and forces, energy and waves. Physical science courses present students with the opportunity to study physical science through the lens of the transfer or conversion of energy. This course integrates engineering and environmental principles into the study of the physical sciences.

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH

French 1

World Languages I courses typically cover topics that allow students to lay the foundation of their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language for beginning World Language I courses present students with the opportunity to acquire the ability to use a language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language I courses are considered introductory courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards.

Spanish 1

World Languages I courses typically cover topics that allow students to lay the foundation of their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language for beginning World Language I courses present students with the opportunity to acquire the ability to use a language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language I courses are considered introductory courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards.

Spanish 3

World Languages III courses typically cover topics that allow students to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Languages III courses present students with the opportunity to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages III courses are a level beyond intermediate and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education 6

Physical education courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop and expand their motor skills and movement, by applying strategies, biomechanics, motor learning, and fitness principles to their participation in a variety of physical activities. Physical education courses provide students with the opportunity to improve their personal fitness by goal setting and participation in specific activities that lead to improved health.

Physical Education 7

Physical education courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop and expand their motor skills and movement, by applying strategies, biomechanics, motor learning, and fitness principles to their participation in a variety of physical activities. Physical education courses provide students with the opportunity to improve their personal fitness by goal setting and participation in specific activities that lead to improved health.

Physical Education 8

Physical education courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop and expand their motor skills and movement, by applying strategies, biomechanics, motor learning, and fitness principles to their participation in a variety of physical activities. Physical education courses provide students with the opportunity to improve their personal fitness by goal setting and participation in specific activities that lead to improved health.

High School Courses

MY Academy High School courses aren’t just accredited and NCAA approved. Rather, we go beyond alignment to provide an engaging curriculum designed for today’s teen learner. Students experience videos, illustrations, virtual reality, and interactive content to help them master critical concepts and truly enjoy learning.

MATHEMATICS

Algebra 1

Algebra I courses typically cover topics such as a linear, quadratic, and exponential expressions and functions as well as some work with absolute value and step-wise functions. Algebra I courses present students with the opportunity to deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships; contrast linear, quadratic, and exponential relationships with each other and engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions; extend the laws of exponents to square and cube roots; and apply linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend.

Algebra 2

Algebra II courses typically cover topics that allow students to build on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, and extend their knowledge of functions to include logarithmic, polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Algebra II courses present students with opportunities to relate arithmetic of rational expressions to arithmetic of rational numbers; expand understandings of functions and graphing to include trigonometric functions; synthesize and generalize functions and extend understanding of exponential functions to logarithmic functions; and relate data display and summary statistics to probability and explore a variety of data collection methods.

Calculus

AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. You’ll learn how to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and how to make connections amongst these representations. You will learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

College Course Math

College mathematics typically cover any mathematics courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).

Consumer Math

Consumer Math courses typically cover topics such as budgeting, taxation, credit, banking service, insurance, buying and selling products and services, home and/or car ownership and rental, managing personal income, and investment. Consumer Math courses present students with the opportunity to reinforce basic mathematics skills and link those skills to consumer applications.

Geometry

Geometry courses typically cover topics that develop students knowledge in establishing criteria for congruence of triangles based on rigid motions; establishing criteria for similarity of triangles based on dilations and proportional reasoning; informally developing explanations of circumference, area, and volume formulas; applying the Pythagorean Theorem to the coordinate plane; proving basic geometric theorems; and extending work with probability. Geometry courses present students with the opportunity to explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, as well as present and hear formal mathematical arguments.

Integrated Math 1

Integrated Mathematics I courses typically cover topics that combine the basic principles of algebra, geometry, and statistics and probability. Integrated Mathematics I courses present students with the opportunity to extend their understanding of numerical manipulation to algebraic manipulation; synthesize understanding of function; deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships; solving problems involving systems of equations and inequalities; apply linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend; establish criteria for congruence based on rigid motions; and apply the Pythagorean Theorem to the coordinate plane.

Integrated Math 2

Integrated Mathematics II integrates topics and concepts in algebra and geometry. These courses typically cover topics such as quadratic expressions, equations, and functions and compare their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships learned in Integrated Mathematics I. Integrated Mathematics II courses present students with the opportunity to develop their knowledge to extend the laws of exponents to rational exponents; create and solve equations and inequalities involving linear, exponential, and quadratic expressions; extend work with statistics and probability; and establish criteria for similarity of triangles based on dilations and proportional reasoning.

Integrated Math 3

Integrated Mathematics III courses integrate topics and concepts in algebra and geometry. Typically these courses cover topics that extend their knowledge of algebra and functions (including radicals, rational expressions, polynomial functions, logarithmic functions, sequences and series), trigonometry, and statistics and probability. Integrated Mathematics III courses present students with the opportunity to apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data; expand their understanding of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions; perform arithmetic operations with functions; expand right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles; and consolidate functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems.

Math Skills 7002

Foundational Math Support courses typically occur in parallel to the core math course. These courses typically cover foundational topics such as basic skills with whole numbers and rational numbers, algebraic reasoning, and other topics that are foundational to the core course. Math support also provides scaffolding for students who are presented with new concepts in their core math course. Math Support courses present opportunities for students struggling in math to obtain targeted small group instruction and assistance to meet grade level expectations.

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus courses typically include topics such as coordinate geometry with analytical methods and proofs, equations and graphs of conic sections, rectangular and polar coordinates, parametric equations, and vectors. Pre-Calculus courses present students with the opportunity to develop their knowledge of polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and rational functions and their graphs; induction; limits and rate change; continuity; and problem analysis.

Probability and Statistics

Probability and Statistics courses typically cover topics such as independent events, conditional probability, discrete random variables; standard distributions; mean, median, and mode; variance and standard deviation; and data organization. Probability and Statistics Courses present students with the opportunity to get an introduction to the study of probability, interpretation of data, and fundamental statistical problem solving and gain a solid foundation in probability theory and calculations and processing statistical information.

ENGLISH

College Course English

College English courses typically cover any English courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).

English 9

English 9 courses typically cover topics that build students skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. English 9 courses present students with the opportunity to comprehend and evaluate complex texts across a range of types and disciplines, construct effective arguments in writing and speaking, and convey understanding as warranted by the task. English 9 courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.

English 10

English 10 courses typically cover topics such as the study of fiction and non-fiction literature, argumentative writing, as well as creating multi-paragraph thematic essays and compositions. English 10 courses present students with the opportunity to improve their reading comprehension and knowledge acquisition, develop the skills to determine the purposes and themes of authors, and to recognize the techniques employed by authors to achieve their goals. English 10 courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.

English 11

English 11 courses typically cover topics that continue to develop students writing skills, emphasizing clear, logical writing patterns, word choice, and usage, as students write and revise essays and learn the techniques of writing research papers. English 11 courses present students with the opportunity to continue to read, analyze, and question complex works of literature and other written materials that often form the backbone of the writing assignments. In English 11 courses, students argumentative writing use precise, knowledgeable claims and counter claims. English 11 courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.

English 12

English 12 courses typically cover topics that continue to develop students mastery of writing skills, emphasizing clear, logical writing patterns, word choice, and usage. English 12 courses present students with the opportunity to write and revise critical and comparative analyses of classic and contemporary literature, literary non-fiction, non-fiction, and other genres. In English 12 courses, students will demonstrate knowledge of research techniques, including a sophisticated use of argument, evidence, and effective counter claims. English 12 courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.

English Literature and Composition

Learn to analyze and interpret imaginative literature through the careful reading and critical analysis of representative works from various genres and periods. Explore literary elements such as a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone. Develop your writing skills as you express your ideas and analysis in expository, analytical, and argumentative essays.

English Skills 7001

English support courses typically cover topics such as basic language skills and integrate reading, writing, speaking, and listening while emphasizing individual student progress. English support courses present students with the opportunity to build upon their vocabulary, spelling and grammar, writing and composition, reading silently or aloud, and improving listening and comprehension skills. English support courses may take place in a laboratory setting or resource center and course content depends on the students abilities entering the course.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Chemistry

Chemistry courses typically cover topics such as the properties and structure of matter, chemical reactions, the conservation of energy, and energy transfer. Chemistry courses present students with the opportunity to plan investigations, develop and use models, and observe trends and patterns. Engineering and environmental principles will also be investigated.

AP Chemistry

Learn about the fundamental concepts of chemistry such as structure and states of matter, intermolecular forces, reactions, and how to use chemical calculations to solve problems. Develop your ability to think clearly and express your ideas with clarity and logic, both orally and in writing. Work with classmates to conduct meaningful laboratory investigations that let you observe chemical reactions and substances, interpret your findings, and communicate your results.

Computer Science

The fundamentals of programming and problem solving using the JAVA language. Students will develop skills for future study or a career in computer science or other STEM fields.

Earth and Space Science

Earth and space science courses typically cover topics associated with Earths place in the universe, Earths systems and Earth and human activity. Earth and space science courses present students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of processes that shape the world around them. This course also investigates how humans interact with the natural world by integrating Californias Environmental Principles and Concepts. Geoscience is another name used to identify the course.

Physics

Physics courses typically cover topics such as forces and motion, gravity, electricity, magnetism, energy, waves and electromagnetic radiation. Physics courses present students with opportunities for developing and using models, planning and conducting investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematical and computational thinking, and constructing explanations. Physics courses integrate a study of engineering design, links among engineering, technology, science, and society and environmental principles.

LIFE SCIENCE

Biology

Biology courses typically cover topics such as structure and function, inheritance and variation of traits, matter and energy in organisms and ecosystems, interdependent relationships in ecosystems, natural selection, evolution, adaptation and biodiversity. Biology courses present students with the opportunity to develop and use biological models, identify cause and effect and recognize human impacts on the natural world. This science course also presents students with the opportunity to develop scientific reasoning skills through Science and Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts.

Life Science

Life Science courses typically cover topics such as ecosystems, photosynthesis and respiration, cells and body systems, evolution, inheritance and genetics and natural selection. Life science courses present students with an opportunity to apply the principles of conservation, investigate interrelationships of organisms within ecosystems and develop environmental literacy.

ECONOMICS

Economics

Economics courses typically cover fundamental economic concepts, comparative economic systems, microeconomics, macroeconomics, and international economic concepts. Economics courses present students with an opportunity to deepen their understanding of the basic economic problems and institutions of the nation and world in which they live and make reasoned decisions on economic issues as citizens, workers, consumers, business owners and managers, and members of civic groups.

GOVERNMENT

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education 1A

Physical Education I courses typically cover topics such as aquatics, rhythms/dance, individual and dual activities, the mechanics of body movement, and the effects of fitness on dynamic health. This course is the first year of the high school physical education sequence.

Physical Education 1B

Physical Education II courses typically cover topics such as gymnastics/tumbling, combative, team sports, the mechanics of body movement, and the effects of fitness on dynamic health. This course is the second year of the high school foundation courses, it expands the content of course I and includes the remainder of the required content areas.

Physical Education Skills 7005

Special Education Support-Resource Specialist Program (RSP) courses typically cover topics that support special education students to be successful in a grade-level academic courses. Special education support courses present students with the opportunity to receive additional instruction to assist them in their regular academic courses.

HISTORY

US History

United States History courses typically cover major turning points in American history and emphasize specific themes, such as the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts; the continuing tension between the individual and the state and between minority rights and majority power; and the emergence of a modern economy. United States history courses present students with the opportunity to study the impact of technology on American society and culture; change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movements toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the development of the United States as a world power.

World History

World History courses typically cover topics such as the socio-economic, political, and ideological conditions of various time periods as well as significant historical events and cultural achievements of world regions. World History courses present students with the opportunity to learn about the achievements of civilizations and countries, particularly in the fields of science, technology, and the arts, and how they spread through cultural diffusion. Students will compare and contrast the development and beliefs of the major world religions, explain how they spread to other regions, and resulted in ideological conflicts throughout history.

COLLEGE CAREER EXPLORATION

Business Marketing and Finance

This code is used for courses that explore multiple industry sectors and/or pathways. This course recruits students into a variety of sectors and/or pathways, allowing them to make a more confident decision about which one to pursue. It is a pre-introductory class and the class does not contribute to the 300 hours requirement of a pathway.

Entrepreneurship

This code is used for courses that explore multiple industry sectors and/or pathways. This course recruits students into a variety of sectors and/or pathways, allowing them to make a more confident decision about which one to pursue. It is a pre-introductory class and the class does not contribute to the 300 hours requirement of a pathway.

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH

American Sign Language

World Languages I courses typically cover topics that allow students to lay the foundation of their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language for beginning World Language I courses present students with the opportunity to acquire the ability to use a language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language I courses are considered introductory courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards.

French 1

World Languages I courses typically cover topics that allow students to lay the foundation of their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language for beginning World Language I courses present students with the opportunity to acquire the ability to use a language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language I courses are considered introductory courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards.

French 2

World Languages II courses typically cover topics that allow students to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages II courses present students with the opportunity to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Language II courses are a level beyond introductory courses and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.

French Language and Culture

Develop your French language proficiency through the exploration of a variety of interdisciplinary themes that tie closely to French culture. In this course, you will use authentic French materials and sources to develop your language skills in multiple modes of communication, including two-way interactions in both writing and speaking, interpretation of audio, audiovisual, and print materials, and oral and written presentation of information and ideas.

German 1

World Languages I courses typically cover topics that allow students to lay the foundation of their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language for beginning World Language I courses present students with the opportunity to acquire the ability to use a language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language I courses are considered introductory courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards.

German 2

World Languages II courses typically cover topics that allow students to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages II courses present students with the opportunity to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Language II courses are a level beyond introductory courses and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.

Intro to Visual Arts

Visual Arts courses typically cover design elements and principles, language, materials, and creative processes used to produce various kinds of visual arts. Visual Arts courses provide students with knowledge and opportunities to explore a variety of art forms and to create individual works of art. Students address the artistic processes of creating, presenting, responding and connecting and become artistically literate within the art form. The use of skills such as communication, creativity, critical thinking, and problem solving are part of every course, the 21st Century Skills, which contribute to student success in a global economy and in culturally diverse environments. Visual arts courses include the traditional fine arts such as, but not limited to, drawing, painting, ceramics, metals, printmaking, fiber arts, photography, sculpture, works in wood, and mixed media; architectural, environmental, and industrial arts such as urban interior, product, and landscape design as well as the folk arts.

Kumeyaay 1

World Languages I courses typically cover topics that allow students to lay the foundation of their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language for beginning World Language I courses present students with the opportunity to acquire the ability to use a language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language I courses are considered introductory courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards.

Kumeyaay 2

World Languages II courses typically cover topics that allow students to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages II courses present students with the opportunity to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Language II courses are a level beyond introductory courses and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.

Kumeyaay 3

World Languages III courses typically cover topics that allow students to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Languages III courses present students with the opportunity to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages III courses are a level beyond intermediate and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.

Professional Photography A

Visual Arts courses typically cover design elements and principles, language, materials, and creative processes used to produce various kinds of visual arts. Visual Arts courses provide students with knowledge and opportunities to explore a variety of art forms and to create individual works of art. Students address the artistic processes of creating, presenting, responding and connecting and become artistically literate within the art form. The use of skills such as communication, creativity, critical thinking, and problem solving are part of every course, the 21st Century Skills, which contribute to student success in a global economy and in culturally diverse environments. Visual arts courses include the traditional fine arts such as, but not limited to, drawing, painting, ceramics, metals, printmaking, fiber arts, photography, sculpture, works in wood, and mixed media; architectural, environmental, and industrial arts such as urban interior, product, and landscape design as well as the folk arts.

Professional Photography B

Visual Arts courses typically cover design elements and principles, language, materials, and creative processes used to produce various kinds of visual arts. Visual Arts courses provide students with knowledge and opportunities to explore a variety of art forms and to create individual works of art. Students address the artistic processes of creating, presenting, responding and connecting and become artistically literate within the art form. The use of skills such as communication, creativity, critical thinking, and problem solving are part of every course, the 21st Century Skills, which contribute to student success in a global economy and in culturally diverse environments. Visual arts courses include the traditional fine arts such as, but not limited to, drawing, painting, ceramics, metals, printmaking, fiber arts, photography, sculpture, works in wood, and mixed media; architectural, environmental, and industrial arts such as urban interior, product, and landscape design as well as the folk arts.

Spanish 1A

World Languages I courses typically cover topics that allow students to lay the foundation of their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language for beginning World Language I courses present students with the opportunity to acquire the ability to use a language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language I courses are considered introductory courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards.

Spanish 1B

World Languages I courses typically cover topics that allow students to lay the foundation of their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language for beginning World Language I courses present students with the opportunity to acquire the ability to use a language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language I courses are considered introductory courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards.

Spanish 2A

World Languages II courses typically cover topics that allow students to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages II courses present students with the opportunity to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Language II courses are a level beyond introductory courses and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.

Spanish 2B

World Languages II courses typically cover topics that allow students to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages II courses present students with the opportunity to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Language II courses are a level beyond introductory courses and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.

Spanish 3A

World Languages III courses typically cover topics that allow students to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Languages III courses present students with the opportunity to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages III courses are a level beyond intermediate and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.

Spanish 3B

World Languages III courses typically cover topics that allow students to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Languages III courses present students with the opportunity to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages III courses are a level beyond intermediate and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.

Spanish Language and Culture A

Develop your Spanish language proficiency and your ability to understand the products, practices and perspectives of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Use authentic materials and sources in Spanish to demonstrate your language proficiencies in multiple modes of communication, including Interpersonal Communication (two-way written interactions and conversations), Interpretive Communication, (interpretation of written, audio, and audiovisual materials), and Presentational Communication (oral and written presentations of information, opinions, and ideas).

Spanish Language and Culture B

Develop your Spanish language proficiency and your ability to understand the products, practices and perspectives of the cultures where Spanish is spoken. Use authentic materials and sources in Spanish to demonstrate your language proficiencies in multiple modes of communication, including Interpersonal Communication (two-way written interactions and conversations), Interpretive Communication, (interpretation of written, audio, and audiovisual materials), and Presentational Communication (oral and written presentations of information, opinions, and ideas).

VAPA Skills 7006A

Special Education Support-Resource Specialist Program (RSP) courses typically cover topics that support special education students to be successful in a grade-level academic courses. Special education support courses present students with the opportunity to receive additional instruction to assist them in their regular academic courses.

VAPA Skills 7006B

Special Education Support-Resource Specialist Program (RSP) courses typically cover topics that support special education students to be successful in a grade-level academic courses. Special education support courses present students with the opportunity to receive additional instruction to assist them in their regular academic courses.

SCIENCE

Science Skills 7003

Special Education Support-Resource Specialist Program (RSP) courses typically cover topics that support special education students to be successful in a grade-level academic courses. Special education support courses present students with the opportunity to receive additional instruction to assist them in their regular academic courses.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Social Science Skills 7004

Special Education Support-Resource Specialist Program (RSP) courses typically cover topics that support special education students to be successful in a grade-level academic courses. Special education support courses present students with the opportunity to receive additional instruction to assist them in their regular academic courses.

A-G Courses

a-g courselist

Students wishing to be considered for admission to a four-year public college in California (either the California State University or University of California systems) must meet a series of course requirements called A through G (A-G). Students must take and pass the A-G course requirements – 15 specific high school courses with a grade of C or better. UC/CSU Admissions subject requirement (A-G). MY Academy offers a UC-CSU approved A-G high school course list that includes more than 225 approved course titles.

A-G Course List

NCAA/Student Athletes

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MY Academy’s NCAA High School Code is 851295.

MY Academy students can establish NCAA eligibility for athletic aid, practice, and competition.

If your dream is to participate in NCAA Division I or II athletics, you need to be certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center. The NCAA has completed the school/program review for MY Academy Courses and proof of graduation from MY Academy may be used in the NCAA initial-eligibility certification process.

NCAA Core Course List

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